Meet our P.G. of the Week: Kevin Mandeville, P.G., Engineering Geologist and Partner, Brierley Associates

Kevin Mandeville is an Engineering Geologist and Partner at Brierley Associates. He puts his Texas Professional Geoscientist license to use through his work in tunneling. By understanding the geology, Kevin is able to help spot potential risks and hazards that may otherwise be a danger to society and/or affect project economics. Say hello to Kevin Mandeville, our P.G. of the week!

 
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1. Tell us about your background. What do you do, your interests, hobbies, etc?

I was born on the beautiful island of Bermuda and was fortunate enough to have lived all over the world during my youth.  Most of my years growing up were spent in Germany where I attended German speaking schools, totally immersed in the culture. I am happily married with two awesome sons, ages 10 and 13.  The family shares my passion for traveling and loves to take big international trips to far-off spots. Our motto is “traveling is money well spent.”

I am an Engineering Geologist and Partner at Brierley Associates specializing in tunnels and underground projects.

2. What college did you attend? Did college prepare you for the ASBOG?

I graduated from the University of Texas at Austin which undoubtedly prepared me for the ASBOG.  Straight out of college, I went into the Oil & Gas industry doing deep water geophysics in the Gulf of Mexico and also working in many different parts of West Africa.  I transitioned into the geotechnical space from the Oil & Gas industry where I have ultimately found my niche in the tunneling realm.  Most certainly, college coupled with my professional career prepared me for the ASBOG.

 
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3. Why did you become a licensed professional geoscientist?

I became a licensed professional geoscientist because I realized how important it was to work on challenging projects and certify my work.  I love to fit the pieces together on why the subsurface is the way that it is and how the subsurface got to be the way that it is.  Fitting the geology together on subsurface profiles is like artwork, and painting that canvas is very rewarding to me.

4. How long have you been a professional geoscientist?

I have been a licensed professional geoscientist since April 2009.

5. How have you helped the public with your PG license?

As an engineering geologist, working in the underground space can be very challenging and dangerous. Knowing how the geology will behave with regards to the tunneling methods that are acting upon it is a huge value that an engineering geologist can bring to the public sector.  By anticipating these inherent risks, I can mitigate any potential hazards to the public on every tunnel project that I work on. Most of the time they are not even aware of what is going on beneath their feet, which means that we are doing our job!

 
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6. How does your job require you to use your PG license?

For tunnels, we regularly prepare Geotechnical Baseline Reports where we identify the risks and baseline the subsurface materials for the contractor to be successful on underground projects.  These baseline reports include interpretive subsurface profiles that clearly identify the potential risks that the Contractor should be prepared for thus protecting the public from any construction mishaps. These reports are stamped and sealed to guarantee the public that dedication, skill, experience, and quality have been put into this work.

7. As a licensed PG, what is the most interesting thing you have seen or done?

Probably the coolest thing is that I can say is that I’ve walked underneath Lake Travis, Lady Bird Lake, Waller Creek and Barton Creek.  I’m sure that not too many people can say that!

 
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8. What would you tell someone in school who wants to gain their PG Licensure?

Without a doubt they should pursue it!  Take the Fundamentals of Geology as soon as you can so that everything is fresh in your mind. Don’t wait like I did.

9. Why is licensure in the state of Texas important to you?

It is extremely important to me and should be extremely important to the public because it is assurance that the work was done by a qualified and dedicated licensed geologist.  Every time I stamp something with my P.G. seal, I am telling everyone that I certify this work.

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Randi Walker